Saving Money with Film Photography

I’ve heard a lot of people say they haven’t tried film because it’s too expensive. Myself included. The main reason I took so long getting started with film–other than sheer laziness–was because I was thoroughly convinced I did not have the financial means. But I’m so glad I finally took the plunge, even if it took a few initial purchases. Because while digital might be what’s best for most, I think I’ve always been a film-tographer at heart.

I’m not going to lie on here and say film can’t get pricey, that labs don’t cost more than they used to, that your 1980s Pentax K1000 won’t need any more trips to the shop than a brand-new digital camera, but I’m also not going to say film photography isn’t possible. Photography as a whole is an expensive hobby. Whether we’re buying SD cards and saving up for our dream lens that’s priced at well over a grand, or buying five rolls of film for the next shoot and saving up for a Hasselblad, we’re spending some serious moo-lah. And it’s not fair to say one is pricier than the other. They both cost.

But they are both equally as worth it.

I’ll come clean. I’m not swimming in millions (or even dollars, at the moment), which means I learned very quickly how to save money and still do what I love. If you’ve just gotten started with film, or are going through a rough financial patch and photography is the only thing that’s keeping you sane, here are a few money-saving tips I’ve learned from both experience, and from my fellow film-tog friends. Continue reading

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What Film Has Taught Me

I grew up with film, with disposable cameras and Polaroids, with waiting for my photos to be developed and grinning at the snapshots I got of my new kitten, of my bike, of the roses in the backyard beside the driveway.

But it wasn’t until around April of this year that film became a serious part of my photography career, when I learned that I didn’t need a darkroom to develop my own film. Since then I’ve been trying out all different kinds of films, cameras, and techniques, and I’ve learned just how different film is than digital. No longer could I just snap a thousand pictures and take them home to look at them right away on the computer. I had to wait. I had to think. I had to reflect on what I’d accomplished, without knowing whether I’d accomplished anything. At first it was really difficult to make such a change, but now I embrace it, and I embrace the way film has changed me as a photographer. Continue reading