Saving Money with Film Photography

I’ve heard a lot of people say they haven’t tried film because it’s too expensive. Myself included. The main reason I took so long getting started with film–other than sheer laziness–was because I was thoroughly convinced I did not have the financial means. But I’m so glad I finally took the plunge, even if it took a few initial purchases. Because while digital might be what’s best for most, I think I’ve always been a film-tographer at heart.

I’m not going to lie on here and say film can’t get pricey, that labs don’t cost more than they used to, that your 1980s Pentax K1000 won’t need any more trips to the shop than a brand-new digital camera, but I’m also not going to say film photography isn’t possible. Photography as a whole is an expensive hobby. Whether we’re buying SD cards and saving up for our dream lens that’s priced at well over a grand, or buying five rolls of film for the next shoot and saving up for a Hasselblad, we’re spending some serious moo-lah. And it’s not fair to say one is pricier than the other. They both cost.

But they are both equally as worth it.

I’ll come clean. I’m not swimming in millions (or even dollars, at the moment), which means I learned very quickly how to save money and still do what I love. If you’ve just gotten started with film, or are going through a rough financial patch and photography is the only thing that’s keeping you sane, here are a few money-saving tips I’ve learned from both experience, and from my fellow film-tog friends. Continue reading

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What is Freelensing, and How Can You Get Started?

I’ve been freelensing since 2015, so I often forget that it’s still not a well-known craft. I find myself talking about it casually with friends and fellow photographers, only to stop short when I notice their blank stares.

But freelensing has changed my photography so much since I first learned about it from another photographer, so I feel a strong desire to spread the word. Freelensing rocks, and EVERYONE should give it a try at least once.

Assuming you’re in for the risk… Continue reading

DIY Pinhole Photography

A recent article written by Steven Dempsey showed up on my Twitter feed Saturday. I was drawn to the eerie quality of his work as I read about his passion for pinhole photography, which he achieves with a DIY lens he made with a body cap.

Not one to pass up an opportunity to destroy a camera accessory for the sake of art, I immediately sent my engineer husband the wikihow directions. He’d already taken apart my 50mm and removed the rings so I can use it better during freelensing, and he needed a new project. Continue reading